US likely spared from big COVID-19 winter surge: 8 updates 

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Two COVID-19 lab test kits could show false positive results, the FDA said. 

Here are eight COVID-19 updates from the past week: 

1. The U.S. may be spared from a significant surge in COVID-19 cases this winter, according to the latest analysis from the COVID-19 Scenario Modeling Hub, a group of researchers that advises the CDC. 

2. Yale New Haven (Conn.) Health said about 700 of its employees remain unvaccinated against COVID-19 and could eventually face termination if they fail to meet the system's vaccination requirement. 

3. A physician from Oregon had his medical license revoked and was fined $10,000 for spreading COVID-19 misinformation and refusing to wear a mask in his medical practice.

4. Michigan has seen the biggest increase in administered COVID-19 vaccines, with vaccination rates rising by 68 percent in the past week. Here's how vaccination rates are changing in each state — up in 26, down in 24.

5. Two COVID-19 lab test kits made by Abbott Molecular could show false positive results, the FDA said Sept. 20. 

6. Without federal relief, hospitals would lose as much as $94 billion in 2021. Here are five numbers quantifying this COVID-19 surge's cost. 

7. Healthcare workers are now among those eligible to receive a COVID-19 booster shot, as the FDA granted emergency use authorization for a booster dose of Pfizer's vaccine for Americans who are ages 65 and older, have a job that increases their risk of infection or are at high risk of severe COVID-19.

8. More than 800 hospitals — 40 percent of all rural hospitals in the country — were either at immediate or high risk of closure before the COVID-19 pandemic, and continuing financial pressures have some Alabama hospitals on the brink of shutting down. Read more here.

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